Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Vampire Armand: The Vampire Chronicles 6 file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Vampire Armand: The Vampire Chronicles 6 book. Happy reading The Vampire Armand: The Vampire Chronicles 6 Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Vampire Armand: The Vampire Chronicles 6 at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Vampire Armand: The Vampire Chronicles 6 Pocket Guide.

While they remained unharmed, young vampires everywhere were destroyed by fire and even mighty elders were badly burned. Following this, the fledgling Marius - a gifted Roman scholar - went to Egypt and retrieved the Divine Parents, making them his sacred responsibility as the new keeper.

At some point in time, Maharet returned to her village on Mount Carmel in the guise of a distant family member. She returned periodically over the course of many centuries to keep a record of her descendants, all the way down to Jesse Reeves - one of the last of the Great Family. Rice's vampires differ in many ways from their traditional counterparts such as Dracula. With the exceptions of sunlight and flames, they are unaffected by crucifixes, garlic, a stake through the heart, or holy water. Ancient immortals are almost completely unaffected by the sun. The key trait of Rice's vampires is that they are unusually emotional and sensual, prone to aesthetic thinking and sexual deviancy.

This lends well to artistic pursuits such as painting, writing, and singing; all of which are refined by their eidetic memory and heightened beauty. Beyond their refined physical features, Rice's vampires are unique in that their appearance is more statue-like than human. Their pupils are luminous while in the dark and their nails appear more like glass. Being undead, their skin is likewise pallid as well as unusually smooth. Additionally, upon being sired, the vampire's body is essentially frozen in the state in which it died.

Their hair and nails cease to grow; if they are cut, they will quickly grow back. The undead also possess no bodily fluids other than blood, as they are purged following death. While virtually all other internal bodily functions expire, Rice's vampires still possess a noticeable heartbeat - albeit considerably slower than that of a living heart.

This ensures normal blood circulation and also synchronizes with that of their fledglings while turning them. When vampires enter a state of hibernation, their hearts cease to beat and they enter into a desiccated state in which their bodies become skeletal and dry from lack of blood flow. Blood starvation may also trigger this. Removing their heart from their bodies will also kill them. Despite these differences, Rice's undead do share some similarities with mainstream vampire fiction. They are supernaturally strong and can move faster than the eye can see.

Their senses are heightened and they will heal from any injury short of beheading and even reattach limbs. The act of feeding is highly sexualized in Rice's novels. Vampire both crave and need blood to sustain their unlife. While they can feed on animals, human blood is more nourishing.

As they age, they're able to resist the urge more to the point where elders feed only for pleasure. As with most vampire fiction, all of the undead were originally human. To sire a fledgling, a maker must feed upon a victim to the point of death. The attacker must then offer their own blood for the mortal to drink. After their body expires, they resurrect as a newborn immortal. Fledglings retain all the memories and mannerisms they had in life, however these usually fade or change over time as they acclimate to their new existence.

Many young vampires experience existential crises or crippling depression as they learn to cope with their isolated nature. Within Rice's mythology, vampires possess certain paranormal abilities known as gifts. For younger undead, these gifts usually manifest in subtle ways. For older immortals - particularly ancient ones - these manifest as potent displays of both magic and their own inhuman natures.

As vampires age, they become both stronger as well as more unnatural and statuesque in their appearance. Their demeanor usually becomes more tampered and calculating, even moreso as their more potent gifts manifest; which further distances them from their former human sentiments. The series creates its own terminology: In ancient times vampires formed a religion-like cult , and in the Middle Ages, believing themselves cursed, dwelt in catacombs under cemeteries in covens which emphasized darkness and their own cursed state.

Vampires are largely solitary; Lestat's "family" of 80 years is described as unusually long. There is no organized society beyond covens, religious bodies, and small groups from time to time. While a few vampires seem to find a way to cope with immortality, most capitulate to self-destructive anger or depression and do not survive beyond some decades or a few centuries. This is described in the series by the saying that vampires "go into the fire or go into history"—the few that survive far longer become legendary or semi-mythical characters.

The most ancient vampires, a thousand or more years old, are known colloquially as "Children of the Millennia". In his life as a vampire, Lestat spends decades trying to find any vampire who is more than a few hundred years old, as a way to learn where they all came from and what their vampiric status means, a quest that eventually leads him to the year-old Marius. Louis de Pointe du Lac tells a young reporter the story of how he had been made a vampire in 18th-century New Orleans by Lestat de Lioncourt. In creating and sheltering the child vampire Claudia , Lestat and Louis had unknowingly set tragedy in motion.

This book chronicles Lestat's own origins, as he resurfaces in the modern world, his attempt to find meaning by exposing himself to humanity in the guise of a rock star, his search when younger for Marius, culminating with his accidental awakening of Akasha , the ancient Egyptian queen and first vampire, who has been immobile for millennia and is being safeguarded by Marius. Lestat has awakened Akasha, the first of all vampires, who has in her thousands of years of immobility, contrived an idealised way to achieve world peace, by killing almost all males and all other vampires that she can destroy.

She is destroyed by Mekare, who has awakened and returned after years to fulfil a promise to destroy Akasha at the moment she poses the greatest threat. A thief switches bodies with him and runs off, and Lestat enlists David Talbot , leader of the Talamasca and one of his only remaining friends, to help him retrieve it. In Memnoch the Devil , Lestat meets the eponymous demon and is faced with a theological personal crisis. Rice's New Tales of the Vampires —'s Pandora and 's Vittorio the Vampire —do not feature Lestat at all, instead telling the stories of the eponymous peripheral vampires, the Patrician Pandora from Rome in the 1st century B.

The origins of Marius de Romanus are explored in 's Blood and Gold , and Blackwood Farm tells the story of young Tarquin Blackwood as he enlists Lestat and Merrick to help him banish a spirit named Goblin. Prince Lestat rejoins the remaining vampires a decade later as Lestat faces pressure to lead them. The series primarily follows the antihero Lestat, and by extension the many humans and vampires whose lives he has touched in his own long existence.

Rice also explores the origins of vampires far more ancient than the so-called "brat prince". In Rice called her vampires a "metaphor for lost souls", adding that "they were metaphors for us The homoerotic overtones of The Vampire Chronicles are also well-documented. On the homoerotic content of my novels: I can only say what I have said many times—that no form of love between consenting individuals appears wrong to me. I see bisexuality as power. When I write I have no gender. It is difficult for me to see the characters in terms of gender. I have written individuals who can fall in love with men and women.

All this feels extremely natural to me. Undoubtedly, there is a deep protest in me against the Roman Catholic attitude toward sexuality. My characters have always been transcending gender I think the main issue with me is love, not gender. I have never understood the great prejudice against gay people in our society I don't know why I see the world that way, but I know that it's very much a point with me, that we should not be bound by prejudices where gender is concerned.

In his book Anne Rice and Sexual Politics: Rice Armand until now has played a small role in the Vampire Chronicles. Rice is equally effective in showing how Armand eventually loses his religion and becomes "the vagabond angel child of Satan," living under Paris cemeteries and foundling the Grand Guignol-ish Theatre des Vampires.

In the twentieth century, a rehabilitated Armand regains faith but falls in love with two children who save his life. By the conclusion of Armand , the pupil has become the mentor. Mass Market Paperback , pages. Published October 3rd by Ballantine Books first published October 10th The Vampire Chronicles 6. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Vampire Armand , please sign up. Is this book written in a similiar style as the two mentioned above or more like the first three novels of the series which I liked?

Doug The chance that you will like this book any better is very very small. The religious arc of Memnoch continues in this book after Armand's involvement …more The chance that you will like this book any better is very very small. The religious arc of Memnoch continues in this book after Armand's involvement in that plotline, and his back-story concentrates on the boring parts of his life. After halfway through the book, I gave up, and I really enjoyed the first 3 books in the series. See 2 questions about The Vampire Armand…. Lists with This Book.

Jul 27, Karen rated it did not like it Shelves: I have no words for how unendurably horrible and boring this book is. Armand knows only how to cry, beg people to love him and seemingly can't get his head around Christ. He is a pathetic wanker that can do nothing on his own, with an unhealthy obsession with Lestat He's 17 when turned a vampire, but when he's years old and still 17 in his head, all you want is to strangle him.

Apart from that - the narrator being an idiot and a madman - the book lacks plot. A I have no words for how unendurably horrible and boring this book is. The ending is also absolute shit. I had hope until the very end, but No, Armand is still a whiny wanker that needs to grow a backbone. View all 7 comments. Apr 14, Leah rated it it was amazing Shelves: For all I adore this book and reread it whenever I feel down, underline some thought provoking passages and short phrases Anne Rice uses and admire her writing style for it's uniqueness, I still believe that Anne Rice showed her crazy in the second half of The Vampire Armand.

Armand is the Botticelli angel, as many call him, and he delights in it, I think, purely so Rice can start the book by having him rip a victims scalp off and stomp on it to spite David Talbot, who asks his to stop. He does p For all I adore this book and reread it whenever I feel down, underline some thought provoking passages and short phrases Anne Rice uses and admire her writing style for it's uniqueness, I still believe that Anne Rice showed her crazy in the second half of The Vampire Armand.

He does present a rather interesting character of the Chronicles. He is, perhaps, the personification of Rice's duality in religion. He was a child of Satan at one point, akin to the yezedi muslims who worship a Satan-like figure, knowing that without bad, there is no good, and that Satan tests all and thus works for God. He does horrible things. And yet he believes himself clear of conscience.

Armand is quite mad. Becomes so as he ages into the New World. He's very unique character in the series, if not for his age, then his personality. However the narration dissolves into religious raving at the oddest of times from mid-way on. At some points Armand is pulled from recounting his story to comment on things to David and it is At this point Rice had no editors, I think, and it really does show.

Half-way through the quality drops considerably and I've found a few spelling errors. Sentences that make no sense and the like. Over time Rice has become as much of a character of these books as she is the author. It's hard to ignore the religious overtones with Armand, because religion played such a huge role in his life.

She's everywhere in the characters and locations.

The Vampire Armand

It's like she's sorting out her own philosophical and religious dilemmas through the characters. I don't see the characters, sometimes, I only see her. It makes it hard to relate to the characters, understand their reverence or fear. I do not recommend this book to those who are new to the series. The Christian influence is thick within the third section of the book, but the first sections of Armand and Marius' formative years in Rome is very much something I adore and would like to think of as dear to me and I hope to others.

Theirs is such a strong bond, at that point in time, and it's clear that Anne enjoyed writing it. Her grasp on history and atmosphere is, as always, absolutely wonderful. She describes paintings, rooms, halls, people, with such an interesting way that it doesn't come of as fantasy-type scenery-porn at all. This is the part I love to go back to and reread.

For writers like myself, it's quite soothing to thumb through her pages and try to break down the book. The paragraphs and sentences. I could compare her prose to Stephen Kings, and yet she is somehow a little better paced than he is. Not so drawn out but still descriptive. It may also be the subject matter, but I still would ask if one likes the way Stephen King writes before recommending Rice for all she is, to me, an essential read to those wanting to know about the rise of vampire fiction.

I can read this book again and again, and feel the same heartache for Armand every time. It never gets old. There's an incredible amount of charm to the book despite its brutal nature in parts, and other shortcomings that just really confused me. First of all, Armand is one of my favourite characters. The way he showed himself in the first two books was utterly fascinating and captivating.

Second, I'm confused why some people complain about the sexuality and erotic scenes with young boys. It may not fit to our culture but it should be remembered that times were different then and this book was about that time also. Now, I don't know what went wrong but I didn't get the same feeling from this Armand's autobiography. Though I liked the desc First of all, Armand is one of my favourite characters. Though I liked the descriptive writing the story bored me every once in a while. There was something missing and it's a real shame. I wanted to weep for Armand and become hooked to his life but it did the complete opposite.

View all 12 comments. Jan 27, Melanie rated it did not like it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm completely unable to like this book. I only read it because I'm a fan of Anne Rice's Vampires' series. I was never really Armand's fan and this book only made me hate him even more. I even tried to see the story through his and Marius' point of view, but no matter how beautiful may be the story of a mature man trapped in a angel-like boy, the constant and exhaustive repetition of this fact is simply annoying.

Armand himself thinks he is too much of an adult, but during the WHOL I'm completely unable to like this book. And there are too many things that Armand does that you just can't understand and not even his moments of supposedly "insanity" explain, unlike what happens with Lestat. The little flashback scenes of the red-haired baby-vampire were only enough to increase my hatred towards this childish character, that did nothing more than cry for his master during more than half of the book so that he would abandon him for no plausible reason.

The only thing that made me want to finish reading this book was nearly the ending, when he finally realizes his own mistakes. People needing to waste copius amounts of time and brain cells. She doesn't know the difference between "yoke" and "yolk"? Armand is in a new room. She spends an hour describing that room.

Then spends an hour describing the clothes they wear while standing in that room. Then spends an hour explaining how Armand feels about the clothes they are wearing while standing in that room. Halfway through the chapter she reminds you why they are in that room. Which is good because after all that useless filler bullshit I've completely forgotten Horrid. Which is good because after all that useless filler bullshit I've completely forgotten that Armand and Marius are still playing "cat and mouse" about their attraction to each other as they have been doing throughout the entire first half of the book.

I didn't finish the second half. Instead I took an hour to describe the room I'm sitting in. Then another hour to describe the clothing I'm wearing while sitting in this room. Then another hour explaining how I feel about these clothes that I wear while sitting in this room View all 3 comments. Armand takes us with him through his childhood in Kiev; from where he is kidnapped and sold to slavery, to Venice where Marius saves him and eventually gives the dark gift and to Paris where he led his Satanic Vampire cult.

Maybe I should start this telling that this was 4th or 5th time reading this and yep, I still love it! When Armand lived in Kiev as a child he painted beautiful icons and was meant to join the monks so he had pretty religious upbringing, which shows through his life and is constant theme through the book. He could let the past go little after meeting his family and his father who was such a huge presence in his life. And I was dreading to reach the part where it would all be ruined! Aug 09, Lidia Fullmer rated it it was amazing. The reason I love this book is not only the character Armand, who is without a doubt my favorite!!

That time happens to be my favorite modern 's to present historical t Well, this is my second favorite book in the Vampire Chronocle series the first is Blackwood Farm, then this, then The Vampire Lestat! That time happens to be my favorite modern 's to present historical time period. The Renaissance was the beginning of modern times and Anne Roce is able to capture it wonderfully. For anyone who is into any history, you'll be pleasantly surprised at how accurate she was in her descriptions.

For those who aren't into history, the stroy is very captivating in itself to hold your attention. It is a little morbid at times, but it goes along with the story.

Navigation menu

A very very good book!! Man, what a bummer. I loved the last four volumes in this series, but this was a mess. Written after a short hiatus from the Vampire Chronicles, this volume follows Memnoch the Devil , which Rice said was supposed to be the series finale. That would have made sense, and it would have been a fine note to end on. Instead, three years later, this mess hit bookstore shelves. First off, Lestat is almost nowhere to be found here.

Armand is certainly one of the more interesting immortals — for his age, if nothing else — but he makes for a booooooring narrator. He lacks all the wit and humor of Lestat; he has no personality of his own. I will be taking an extended break from this series. Jun 07, Greg rated it it was ok Recommends it for: This is where I stopped in the series.

Anne Rice had the habit of making all her characters extremely homo erotic from the beginning, but I could deal with it because the stories were excellent. I had to draw the line at this book though. Reading about ancient vampires giving and receiving head from little boys is not my idea of entertainment. View all 5 comments. What I got from this Novel, is that it is a book about Love, and secondary of Faith. Now u may be saying wait a minute, oh no, must of have been a pre-cursor to Twilight, which BTW I have not read yet.

This is hardly a book bout' "Puppy Dog" teenage love Also I have noted some controversy amongst other reviewers about the elements of Homosexuality in this book. I, as a Heterosexual, was not offended by these passages, and thought they were portrayed rather artisticaly, and not in a pornographic What I got from this Novel, is that it is a book about Love, and secondary of Faith. I, as a Heterosexual, was not offended by these passages, and thought they were portrayed rather artisticaly, and not in a pornographic manner.

Here we read how Armand evolves, from childhood, to Young adulthood which physically at this point he is forever frozen in time, but continues to develop mentally and spiritually. It is also a Journey of Faith and Discovery, one which most of us go through, seeking an understanding or evidence of our Maker.

See a Problem?

This is perhaps the most Dickensian Novel of A. Rice I have read, with sometimes full pages of Social Commentary. Though Interesting in themselves, well thought and written, they tended sometimes to vere from the main plot, and sometimes Bog the reader down. This Book is also a search of Faith. I liked the Detail of the Feeding scenes of the Vampires, how at times they had a sense of empathy for their victims, and then just gruesome enough to remind one, You are reading a Vampire Novel. Not the Page turner of some of Rice's Novels, but then again, i don't think she intended it to be so.

Definately a worthwhile read. View all 4 comments.

The Vampire Armand (Vampire Chronicles #6)

Feb 22, Vanessa rated it it was amazing Shelves: For me, The Vampire Chronicles are the be-all-end-all of vampire novels. And while I have my favorites within the series, I find myself comparing every other vampire novel I read to the entire set. So, if you want to discuss them, go ahead and send me a note. And if you're new to the vampire genre, you can't go wrong with Anne Rice. This one is my second favorite of the series.

May 04, Mrs. Fujiwara rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Apassionata has been the official soundtrack of this book ever since Armand described how wonderful it was Sybelle playing it. And as I have always been very fond of the imaginary surrounding the Vampires, of course it was yet a great pleasure reading this The Apassionata has been the official soundtrack of this book ever since Armand described how wonderful it was Sybelle playing it. And as I have always been very fond of the imaginary surrounding the Vampires, of course it was yet a great pleasure reading this diary.

As I told you personally, dear friend, you gave me a rather pornographic book. But don't be sorry and, please, don't blush like that. The images are very well placed; how could she write about the life of a Russian boy saved from captivity by an antique Roman senator in the XV century Venice without mentioning their beautiful intimacy of master and pupil developing also to a sexual partnership? Oh, and how wonderfully Roman Marius is. My adored and beloved Marius. It was wonderful meeting him again. I never read Rice's books in the right order since I prefer to dive into her shadows with eyes folded.

I prefer to savor every paragraph with that highly anticipated feeling. And up until now I had had great surprises; this book being centered upon Armand's vision of Marius was - of course - the greatest. At least until she decided to drop from the top of her researches and run almost sloppily with the narrative, as usual.

However, this always happens when she is reaching the XX century, so I wonder if it was deliberate - to show us the speed of our times compared to the classic eras where most of her characters came from.

Or even if it was meant to be like that since her books are the result of old thoughts and thus come always in kaleidoscopic images. For that matter, I like Armand's way of thinking and, curiously, we have similar concepts of what people call faith. He is not my favorite, but not the least adored Child of Night from this author either.

I can understand why his master loves him so; he is utterly lovable in essence. But still, I envy Pandora more than him for how Marius loves her. Or I do for now, because I haven't read his own diary yet. I am curious, painfully curious to read his vision of all things I saw through the eyes of so many others. I am thirsty for his own picture of himself as I am sure I'll find many similar things between us. We are Historians, after all, and we seem to love books more than anything else in the world. We are lonely creatures, although we love and inspire love in others.

But is only inside our study room, close to our rolls of parchment, our ink and quill that we truly find peace. I wish I could read his mind now. Unfortunately, though, History awaits for me. I've been neglecting her for two or more weeks because of him, so I ought to go back and be with her a little while praying to find Marius' book on a shelf next time I visit a bookstore.

The Vampire Chronicles - Wikipedia

Marius de Romanus, pages and Jul 24, Jorge rated it it was ok. Jun 05, Spaceferret rated it did not like it. I was good up to about a quarter of the way into the book where suddenly all plot and personality of beloved characters fell to pieces and into a train wreck of a novel. I didn't finish the whole thing because I couldn't bring myself to watch as the corpses of perfectly good characters where poorly forced around the novel.

After finishing Armand's origins just close the book, put it down and walk away. After reading what I did of this book I had to go into a detox using Let The Right One In to r I was good up to about a quarter of the way into the book where suddenly all plot and personality of beloved characters fell to pieces and into a train wreck of a novel. Aug 20, Wendy rated it it was amazing. Another in depth book about Armand, one of the characters in the vampire series for Anne Rice. Excellent, in depth, book that explains his wonderful character, that the other books just touched upon.

Books Online Free

Dec 17, Jess The Bookworm rated it really liked it. This next installment in the Vampire Chronicles continues from the end of Memnoch the Devil. David Talbot approaches Armand to convince him to share his life story with him. Up until now, we have only viewed Armand through the lens of others and from a distance, knowing him to be the "Botticelli Angel", the beautiful eternal adolescent. We now get taken back to Venice years prior to where Armand is a young slave brought over from Russia and rescued by Marius, the ancient vampire, who takes h This next installment in the Vampire Chronicles continues from the end of Memnoch the Devil.

We now get taken back to Venice years prior to where Armand is a young slave brought over from Russia and rescued by Marius, the ancient vampire, who takes him into his coven of young and beautiful boys. It follows Armand's pampered life as a human living in Marius' little harem during the Italian Renaissance, and follows through to his transition into a vampire. It didn't really cover much of what happened in Paris, as this was covered in Interview With the Vampire, but I would have liked a bit more of a recap.

Whilst Anne Rice's novels in this series always hint at the homoerotic, this one was much more so. Armand, for the young little thing he was, really got around and experimented. This novel further follows from the religious musings in Memnoch the Devil, grappling with God and the Devil, good and evil. I don't know why I didn't enjoy this one as much as the others. Perhaps I missed Lestat. Mar 15, Kathryn rated it really liked it Shelves: Overall, my favorite part of this book doesn't even begin until more than three-quarters of the way through. Armand has a VERY tragic story, and I do enjoy getting to see exactly how he became the immortal monster he is today.

And Venice of any age is a great setting for a story. But so often things get bogged down in the details. Armand's love affair with Marius, his fight to keep from remembering his life as a poor Russian artist and Marius' fight to resist making Armand into a vampire too ear Overall, my favorite part of this book doesn't even begin until more than three-quarters of the way through. Armand's love affair with Marius, his fight to keep from remembering his life as a poor Russian artist and Marius' fight to resist making Armand into a vampire too early, it's all so DENSE.

Product details

I think one read of his whole drawn-out vision involving a Russian Easter Egg will last me a lifetime. No, the best part is when Armand gives a point-by-point description of all the other vampires in the series. It's very short, but I love getting to see these characters through Armand's eyes. In some ways it turns everything I've thought about some of them sideways. And there's one description of what REALLY happened in a previous book that is probably one of the most shocking things I've read in this series. I'm a little hesitant to reccommend this book to anyone who loved "Interview with the Vampire", just because I'm afraid that one scene will ruin it for them.

My next favorite section is Armand's platonic love affair with two young human children.


  • The Pirates of the Gargoyle Valley - A Traveling Salesmans Darktime Tale (The Traveling Salesmans Darktime Tales Book 1)?
  • Beratung in der Schule (German Edition).
  • List Chapter or Page:.
  • Die Jesus-Diät (German Edition).
  • Get A Copy.